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May 30, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

Things are in full swing up here in Naden Harbour!

As is typical for May, we’ve had a mixed bag of weather; sunshine, overcast and torrential downpour, sometime all within the same hour. Winds have been fairly tame out of the south east this past week, and look to be getting stronger for the upcoming week.

Guests arrived last Friday, and Chinooks, mostly in the 8-15 pound range. Anglers have been enjoying success at Cape Naden, Cape Edenshaw, Bird Rock 2 and Yatze Bay, however the timing of the action has been hard to predict, so picking a spot and sticking it out has been the key to getting into fish. Both herring and anchovies have been producing fish, as well as smaller spoons and Kingcandy lures, at depths of 25 to 55 feet.

The pinnacles have been the favourite spot for anglers targeting “chicken” halibut, but some guests have been having success by fishing their regular salmon spots a little deeper, and getting their halibut “on the troll”. The weekend trip did see two Tyees on the board, one at 36.4lbs, so there’s always the chance of a big Chinook salmon out there! Tuesday we saw our first Pink salmon of the season, which means the Coho should be showing up soon!

Lead Guide, Liam Longacre


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May 14, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

We’re only a few weeks away from another season of first class fishing! Which means that soon enough you’ll be bringing your catch home to enjoy while sharing stories of your time on the water.

Prepare your Halibut with this Signature Series recipe before your trip, or after. Our chef’s have crafted this to enjoy at any point of the year, with your favourite side dishes.

Materials

  • 4x 170g Halibut Fillets
  • 2g Garlic Powder
  • 2g Paprika
  • 4g Salt
  • 1g Ground Black Pepper
  • 30ml Neutral Cooking Oil
  • 225g Butter
  • 1x Medium Lemon, cut in half

Method

  1. Mix spices together and use to season halibut fillets
  2. In large saute pan place halibut fillets down and sear both sides until both are golden brown, cook 2-4 minutes on each side.
  3. Remove fish from pan once ready, add butter into the hot pan and melt.
  4. Simmer butter for 1-2 minutes and then add juice of lemon.
  5. Simmer sauce for 2-3 minutes while stirring often.
  6. Plate the fish alongside your preferred sides and drizzle lemon butter over top of the Halibut.
  7. Serve and enjoy!

Don’t worry if you’ve moved through your supply of QCL caught fish already, our Taste of B-Sea program runs year round. The finest quality fish and shellfish, these products are Ocean Wise and come from some of the most sustainable fisheries in the world using the most eco-friendly fishing methods.

To learn more and to place your order, contact us | 1-800-688-8959


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March 19, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

We specialize in special moments. In making memories last a lifetime.

The QCL Experience is a simple way of describing a feeling so unique that it’s nearly indescribable. Every guest is different and whether your trip is a celebration, annual tradition, bucket list or simply a new adventure, we understand that every guests’ idea of the perfect trip varies. From the moment you call our office, to your arrival at the Lodge and beyond, our team works to tailor make your QCL Experience.

Our team strives to deliver unmatched hospitality by helping create treasured memories, throughout the entirety of your stay. With programs carefully designed to take full advantage of the unrivaled fishing opportunities, highlight the local flavours, and offer peace away from the busy world, the promise of a first class fishing experience awaits.

We work diligently for 8 months of the year to prepare for each season. Taking into consideration guest comments, reviewing previous season programs, and working towards what will make your next stay unforgettable. As we approach Opening Day, our Concierge Team is connecting with group leads to provide an overview of Lodge services and opportunities. They are available to plan the finer details of your trip, from unique dining options and custom apparel to spa treatments and more. All before you arrive at the Lodge!

And when the time comes, and you’re finally at QCL, we strive to deliver a sense of awe. Tucked away amongst the old growth and a short boat ride from the rugged coastline and incredible fishing. A place where modern-day travelers can revel in a taste of wilderness adventure that is perfectly blended with our warm, attentive hospitality that is delivered by our QCL team. Sharing a passion for delivering your first class fishing trip in a remote paradise. Each member of our team brings a piece of your QCL Experience to life.

The QCL Experience, a simple way to describe that distinctive feeling you get when you think about your first class fishing trip; the recognizable sense of home upon your return. It is our passion to ensure each of our guests leave having experienced memories that you want to share for a lifetime.


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August 26, 2023 Bre Guolo0

With the sun gleaming over Naden Harbour, guests and guides start the day keen on finding Chinook and Coho salmon. With these northwest winds, the fish and bait have been pushed into Cape Naden and the Mazarredo Islands – Where most of our fleet has been tacking hard on each tide putting guests into action. Guides have been running hearing and anchovy to entice the fish in to their gear.

Today for Boat 99, the sun was shining and though the wind had died down the swells were strong; forcing us to start our morning at the top of Cape Naden. with the flooding tide we had no issues running a cut plug on one side and a whole herring on the other, 23-39 ft on the rigger and 8 pulls on the back rod.

10 minutes into our first tack at Naden our deep rod goes off!  My guest Tyson jumped up and ran to the rod not knowing what to expect! 25 minutes later we landed a beautiful Chinook salmon, tapped out to 42 pounds! Tyson made the decision to release this Tyee. Thanks for letting this big one go!

It was a team effort –  From pulling gear to holding the net. Guests Lyndon and David, also onboard, played a large role in successfully getting this fish to the boat. This is how memories are made!

Tight lines and don’t forget to keep your tip up,

Guide, Karly Skakun

 


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July 31, 2023 Tayler Fuerst0

As the Northwest winds start to settle down this week, the fishing continues to thrive.

With the odd kelp line rolling through being our biggest obstacle, the inshore Chinook fishing has been consistent, and with Coho still being caught at most points. Keeping your hooks in the water, as much as possible, has been key around the kelp beds at slack tides, while hog-hunting for the big one. Most anglers don’t need to travel far to get bites but weeding through the Pink salmon looking for Chinook continues to keep all anglers busy!

The slow moving flood tides give anglers plenty of opportunity to get out bottom fishing for longer periods, allowing most guests to get all of their halibut done in one trip offshore.

Outlook for the week – Overall we’re expecting light W to NW winds, mixed skies with sunny period with some of the largest tidal range of the year over the Tuesday full moon (.4 to 18.7ft).

With July in the rearview, the excitement continues to build as step into August. Here’s to incredible fishing and unforgettable memories!

Lead Guide, Chris Manning

 

 


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July 27, 2023 Tayler Fuerst0

Every day fishing in Haida Gwaii is a totally new adventure!

We were off the dock at 7am. The wind was blowing from the northwest and the tide was ebbing. On the way out we encountered some 6-7′ waves but by the time we dropped in on the west bay of Bird Rock 1 all was good as we drifted with the waves.

Running a black gold inline flasher with a green hootchie on the port side… A green inline flasher with a spoon on the starboard… 3 Coho were in the boat by the time we drifted to the east bay of Cape Naden. As we rounded the the point, the port side the rod took a serious dip and the reel started to scream out line! 10 minutes later we had a beautiful 21lb Chinook salmon in the net! We rounded out the day with 3 more Coho and 1 more Chinook salmon. It was a fantastic day on the water.

Guide, Clint Lundie

 


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July 20, 2023 Bre Guolo0

If the 2023 fishing season will be remembered for any one particular thing, it’s very likely to be the shear abundance of fish!  From the early masses of needlefish we’ve encountered inshore since May and the dense schools of herring now over the pinnacles and halibut grounds, it’s no wonder there are so many salmon around!  Throughout the first half of the season we’ve been awash in feeding Chinook and Coho.  These early fish have been smaller than the migratory version we’re more accustomed to, but they’ve more than made up for it with their aggressive nature and persistent hunger for whatever we put in front of them!  Translation… our guests haven’t been sitting down much!

Now that we’ve passed the mid-point of the season, we’re seeing more of what we expect in July, with strong numbers of beautiful, chunky, 20-something Chinooks and those summer Coho are getting up into the 10 pound-plus class.  The Tyee Bell is tolling every evening at the Bell Ringer in celebration of memorable catches… for larger salmon, halibut and lingcod.

Another observation is the interest that our guests are showing in all things ocean and fishery related.  Whether it’s speculation on why so many “feeders” are inshore this summer, to questions about kelp beds and sea urchins, or the difference between resident and transient orcas… there’s a new level of awareness in the air.  And it’s a good thing… we all have a role to play in protecting the health of the oceans and marine life and it starts with being interested.  There’s much to learn and to understand and it’s exciting to share all of this with our guests who come to enjoy the QCL Experience every summer!

Duane Foerter


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July 16, 2023 Tayler Fuerst0

The fishing industry is subject to constant changes in regulations aimed at preserving fish populations and ensuring sustainable practices. Fishing lodges play a vital role in maintaining the delicate balance between anglers’ interests and environmental conservation. This article examines how a fishing lodge effectively handles fishing regulation changes, ensuring compliance, guest satisfaction, and long-term sustainability.

To effectively manage fishing regulation changes, a fishing lodge must stay well-informed. This involves establishing strong communication channels with regulatory authorities, such as fish and wildlife departments, and actively participating in industry associations. Regularly monitoring legislative updates, attending workshops, and engaging in discussions with other lodge operators help ensure QCL remains up-to-date on current and impending regulations.

QCL educates our guests about fishing regulations to foster responsible angling practices. Upon arrival, guests are provided with detailed information about local fishing rules, catch limits, size restrictions, and any recent regulatory changes. Lodge staff are knowledgeable about these regulations to answer guests’ questions accurately and help them understand the importance of adhering to the guidelines.

Establishing a cooperative relationship with regulatory authorities is crucial for our industry. By actively engaging with these entities, we can contribute to the decision-making process and provide valuable insights based on our experience in the field. Open lines of communication facilitate understanding of the lodge’s perspective and allow for our concerns to be addressed when regulations are being formulated or modified.

QCL can play a significant role in promoting catch and release practices to support sustainable fishing. By educating anglers about the benefits of releasing certain fish species, especially those in decline, the lodge can help reduce pressure on vulnerable populations. Implementing policies that incentivize catch and release, such as recognition programs and rewards for anglers who release fish, help us to encourage guests to participate willingly.

To ensure compliance with fishing regulations, QCL has implemented monitoring systems. By employing experienced guides and staff members familiar with local rules, we can monitor angling activities on the water, including catch numbers and sizes. By regularly reporting this information to regulatory authorities, the lodge can contribute to the assessment of fish populations and assist in the evaluation of the effectiveness of existing regulations.

Fishing lodges must maintain a high degree of adaptability and flexibility in response to fishing regulation changes. This involves regularly reviewing internal policies and procedures to ensure compliance with updated rules. Lodge management is prepared to modify fishing programs, adjust catch limits, or introduce new practices as required. Maintaining open communication with guests about any changes and explaining the reasons behind them helps foster understanding and cooperation.

Navigating fishing regulation changes can be a complex task. By staying informed, educating our guests, collaborating with regulatory authorities, encouraging catch and release, implementing monitoring systems, remaining adaptable, and engaging in conservation initiatives, we can effectively handle regulatory changes. This approach ensures the sustainable enjoyment of fishing for guests, the conservation of fish populations, and the overall success of our operation in the long run. By balancing the interests of anglers and environmental conservation, QCL can serve as responsible custodians of the marine resources.

As a note to all of our guests, we appreciate your assistance and understanding when it comes to maintaining all DFO regulations. Together, we can ensure continuity for all of us that love the adventure that is ocean fishing! Should you at any point have any questions, please reach out to our team and we will give you the most up to date information.

 


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June 17, 2023 Tayler Fuerst0

I really do have the best job in the world.

As the Vice President of Sales and Corporate Relations for Queen Charlotte Lodge, I get to do some incredible things.

Every year has its cycle and rhythm. In the fall, after a busy summer, the Lodge is put away for the winter and our team of Sales Executives begin the huge task of selling the next season. Reaching out to potential guests to gauge their interest in hopes we can introduce them to the QCL Experience; and reaching out to previous guests to secure their spot for the upcoming year. Throughout this process, we get to hear our guests’ stories from past trips and their excitement for the next. We strive to curate exceptional memories, and hearing about them firsthand is one of my favourite things about the off-season.

It truly is the best feeling to be able to introduce or reintroduce guests to QCL, and to describe to them the first class experience they are about to have; only to have them come back after their trip to tell us we undersold the adventure and what an unforgettable time they had.

The work put in behind the scenes is nothing compared to the on-season component. Having the opportunity to create, firsthand, those special moments at the Lodge, is what makes my job the best. I leave our offices in Richmond, and head North to the Lodge spending about 40 days on property each season. The first visit is to assist in guide training. While I work in sales, my passion for fishing has developed over the 51 years of on-water experience, and I aim to share the knowledge I’ve gained with our team. After that comes the season itself. A wild, organized, all hands on deck, 120 day period. I have made so many friends over the years and to share the joy of fishing in beautiful Haida Gwaii, there truly is no job that quite compares.

Seeing the awe in the faces of our guests as they arrive onsite, the friendships made and sharing the joy of fishing in such an incredible corner of the world are all parts of what makes my job the best. QCL is a magical place. I am grateful to be involved in such an operation, to experience the best job in the world. Come on up and see what I mean!

Brian Clive

 


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June 13, 2023 Bre Guolo2

So far there are few surprises with our early season fishing.  As you would expect this time of year, the fishing grounds are flush with large numbers of aggressive feeder Springs.  These are not the migratory spawners that we see through much of the summer but young fish in their ocean phase, bulking up on the incredible shoals of needlefish and herring in these northern waters.  There certainly is a lot of bait around, evidenced by multiple Humpbacks feeding in the area. There’s lots of amazing eagle action; we’re sometimes seeing dozens of eagles circling over boiling bait balls, swooping down in turn to grab fistfuls of wriggling needlefish and eating them in mid-air.  It’s really quite a spectacle. The shallow basin that is Virago Sound is especially productive for needlefish or Pacific Sand Lance.  This year they seem to be especially abundant and all of their predators know it!

Salmon action in the past week has been consistent throughout the fishing grounds. Anglers are finding no shortage of feisty, teen-sized  Chinook salmon and occasionally they get a surprise when a 20-plus pounder goes screaming off the rigger.  It’s great to find relatively steady salmon action with a good shot at a bigger fish at any time.  Plus, we’re already seeing several Coho, Chum and Pink salmon in the catch log every day.

QCL anglers are still encountering halibut while trolling inshore, sometimes huge ones!  Over the weekend there were several flatties boated around Capes Naden and Edenshaw.  Long time QCL guest FJ certainly got more than he bargained for while trolling an anchovy along the shoreline from Eagle Rock to Green Point with his guide Jon Landry.  What certainly felt, initially, like a big strong salmon went screaming down the shoreline in 75 feet of water. By the time FJ and Jon were able to get the boat over it they sure knew why this fish could pretty much do what it wanted!  A massive halibut lie alongside the Grady and they called the Fishmaster for assistance.  Using a salmon rod as a yardstick, they concluded FJ’s catch was a 78-inch halibut!  That works out to about 254 pounds – caught on a salmon rod with and anchovy!  So we continue to be in awe of the wonders of these amazing waters – You just never know what could happen next!

We’re experiencing some classic northwesterly conditions this week with our anglers fishing the west side below Klashwun Point.  Last week’s big tides are easing and after today we’ll enjoy light to moderate west to southwest conditions, providing easy access to the full fishing grounds.  Look for more news from the offshore fishery in the next report!

Fishmaster