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May 30, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

Things are in full swing up here in Naden Harbour!

As is typical for May, we’ve had a mixed bag of weather; sunshine, overcast and torrential downpour, sometime all within the same hour. Winds have been fairly tame out of the south east this past week, and look to be getting stronger for the upcoming week.

Guests arrived last Friday, and Chinooks, mostly in the 8-15 pound range. Anglers have been enjoying success at Cape Naden, Cape Edenshaw, Bird Rock 2 and Yatze Bay, however the timing of the action has been hard to predict, so picking a spot and sticking it out has been the key to getting into fish. Both herring and anchovies have been producing fish, as well as smaller spoons and Kingcandy lures, at depths of 25 to 55 feet.

The pinnacles have been the favourite spot for anglers targeting “chicken” halibut, but some guests have been having success by fishing their regular salmon spots a little deeper, and getting their halibut “on the troll”. The weekend trip did see two Tyees on the board, one at 36.4lbs, so there’s always the chance of a big Chinook salmon out there! Tuesday we saw our first Pink salmon of the season, which means the Coho should be showing up soon!

Lead Guide, Liam Longacre


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May 17, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

Whether this will be your first visit to QCL, or your tenth, we know this time of year brings anticipation of a productive fishing and incredible memories.

Our Concierge team is working to connect with each group lead to ensure that your QCL Experience is planned to a tee. Let us worry about the details – arrive as you are and enjoy all the we have to offer.

As you await your trip, spend some time familiarizing yourself with common fishing terms and our Angler Orientation video. The below terms are frequently used on the boats and are a good starting point for those new to fishing to ensure you understand some of the basics upon arrival.

Right Rod to the Rock | When there are multiple boats fishing one particular point, we like to fish “right rod to the rock.” Meaning a boat that has its starboard side or has its right side of the boat closest to the shore, has the right of way to fish closest to the structure/kelp bed/shoreline. This helps to keep boat traffic moving smoothly while trolling and helps prevent boats and anglers from cutting each other off while trying to fish the inside pass.

Trolling | Trolling is a method of fishing where the boat is moving at various slower speeds while towing fishing lines. Most commonly to target salmon on our fishing grounds, your fishing lines can be attached to a downrigger or through the use of weighted rods in a style of fishing called mooching, to fish various depths.

Mooching | Mooching is a style of salmon fishing where lead weights, typically 4 to 10 oz’s., are attached to the fishing line, above the leader, to get the bait/hooks down to a desired depth. Mooching does not use downriggers and typically a cut plug herring is used as bait.

Back Rod | A back rod is used in the stern (back) of the boat as an additional or extra rod while trolling. Not attached to a downrigger, your backrod will have a banana weight or sliding weight attached to the fishing line above the leader. Commonly fished in the top 10 or 15 feet of the water column.

Jigging | A method of fishing used primarily for bottom fishing. A weighted lure, known as a jig, is dropped to the ocean floor , while attached to a fishing line, and is moved up and down by the angler using a fishing rod, to entice a bite.

Dummy Flasher / In-line Flasher | A flasher is a piece of fishing tackle used to attract salmon while trolling. A flasher can be used as a dummy flasher, where it’s attached to your downrigger line  or downrigger cannonball, using swivels and a few feet of thick monofilament or a flasher can also be used “in-line”, where the flasher is attached to one end of your fishing mainline and the other end attached to the leader line.

Pop the Clip | “Pop (or popping) the clip” refers to the motion of pulling your fishing line to release it out of the downrigger clip. There are a few methods to do this but the most common would be to reel your fishing line and rod tighter to the downrigger and while holding onto your fishing reel (to prevent line from spooling off of it), you lift the rod upwards to either set the hook on a fish or to bring in the line.

Let it go/Let it run/Hand off | Commonly said by QCL fishing guides, while their guest is playing a fish, these terms are used when a fish, most often a salmon, is trying to swim away from the angler and to prevent the line from breaking, one will take their reeling hand off of the reel, allowing the salmon to take line while still being hooked, which will tire the fish out. It should be noted that it is VERY important to still hold onto the fishing rod with your non reeling hand. “Let it go” does not mean let go of the rod.

Cut Plug | A presentation for salmon fishing using a herring as bait, where the head of the herring is cut off at certain angles, roughly 45 degrees and the ‘guts’ are removed. There are various ways to attach your hooks to a cut plug,  but the cut plug herring will imitate a wounded baitfish moving through the water.

Tyee | Tyee is most commonly a term for a Chinook salmon which weighs 30 pounds or more. Any guest at QCL who catches a Tyee, released or kept, rings the Tyee bell at the Bell Ringer, and later presented a celebratory pin.

As these are only a handful of the terms used when fishing, please let us know if there is anything else you want to learn! 

We’ll see you at the Dock!


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May 1, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

The 34th season of operation for QCL is swiftly approaching and soon the doors will be open, reels will be screaming and smiles will be plenty.

Every season we welcome guests from around the world for the fishing adventure of a lifetime. From opening day to closing, our guests are in constant awe of the thought and consideration that goes into their vacation. Beyond the rich waters, that offer some of the best fishing grounds in the world, QCL is known for incredible hospitality.

With May 24th just around the corner now, the months of working behind the scenes, both in our Richmond Office and on-site at the Lodge, will soon come to an end. Like every year, our team has been implementing your suggestions and bringing continued improvements to life.

We’re excited to share with you a few updates taking place at the Lodge – new boats, exciting programs (new and revised), and on-going upgrades to our infrastructure.

In 2023 we saw the addition of 10 boats to our fleet, and this year will see an additional 3! Partnering with Bridgeview, we have added to our premium vessel class with one 26” Cabin boat, and two 22” Centre Consoles.

As a testament to the high standard of client care and satisfaction that our guides provide on the water, this year will also see our largest guide team to date!

Without a doubt, one of the most exciting program additions this year is the introduction of our new Tyee Release Club! Designed to promote sustainable fishing by encouraging our guests to engage in salmon conservation, QCL will make a donation towards Salmon Enhancement for each Tyee released.

With our on-water program only a portion of your QCL Experience, the Lodge has seen updates across property.

Continuing to put an emphasis on sustainable choices across the whole property, don’t forget to pop your head into the Kingfisher Gallery or Pro Shop to see the new additions to our retail program. Our team has worked hard to partner with sustainable brands that continue to offer the best in the industry.

Now in the final push, Operations is in the midst of refinishing logs, replacing walkways, and updating finishings. Among these smaller projects, we have also seen completed larger projects – namely replacing the roof on the Main Lodge, and cosmetic changes to select guest rooms. Whether these changes are small or large, the Operations team works alongside the Hospitality team, ensuring guest rooms are well-appointed and comfortable after a full day of being on the water.

Although, these are only a handful of the noticeable updates happening at QCL this year there are plenty that we are anxiously awaiting to share. Together, we are certain that this season will be the best season yet.

With just under a month until Opening Day, we cannot wait until your helicopter lands.


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April 13, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

We’re back with another Signatures Series recipe to wow your family or your guests. Our Back of House team has done an excellent job creating dishes that are easy to prepare and worth adding to your dinner lineup. This Ginger Soy Lingcod is a great addition to any plate.

Materials

  • Lingcod Fillets | 4 x 170g
  • Ginger Slices | x4
  • Cooking Oil | 60ml
  • Honey | 30ml
  • Shallot, finely minced | x1
  • Garlic clove, finely minced | x1
  • Soy Sauce | 125ml
  • Fresh cracked black pepper

Method

  1. In a wok, heat oil.
  2. Add ginger slices to the wok, lightly fry then discard.
  3. Place Lingcod in the same wok and sear for 5 minutes on each side. Remove the fish and keep warm.
  4. Add shallots and garlic to the same wok and saute slightly. Add honey and soy sauce and reduce until syrup. Pour over fish.
  5. Pour the sauce over the fish, paired with your choice of sides. Serve and enjoy!

Don’t worry if you’ve moved through your supply of QCL caught fish already, our Taste of B-Sea program runs year round. The finest quality fish and shellfish, these products are Ocean Wise and come from some of the most sustainable fisheries in the world using the most eco-friendly fishing methods.

To learn more and to place your order, contact us | 1-800-688-8959


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March 19, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

We specialize in special moments. In making memories last a lifetime.

The QCL Experience is a simple way of describing a feeling so unique that it’s nearly indescribable. Every guest is different and whether your trip is a celebration, annual tradition, bucket list or simply a new adventure, we understand that every guests’ idea of the perfect trip varies. From the moment you call our office, to your arrival at the Lodge and beyond, our team works to tailor make your QCL Experience.

Our team strives to deliver unmatched hospitality by helping create treasured memories, throughout the entirety of your stay. With programs carefully designed to take full advantage of the unrivaled fishing opportunities, highlight the local flavours, and offer peace away from the busy world, the promise of a first class fishing experience awaits.

We work diligently for 8 months of the year to prepare for each season. Taking into consideration guest comments, reviewing previous season programs, and working towards what will make your next stay unforgettable. As we approach Opening Day, our Concierge Team is connecting with group leads to provide an overview of Lodge services and opportunities. They are available to plan the finer details of your trip, from unique dining options and custom apparel to spa treatments and more. All before you arrive at the Lodge!

And when the time comes, and you’re finally at QCL, we strive to deliver a sense of awe. Tucked away amongst the old growth and a short boat ride from the rugged coastline and incredible fishing. A place where modern-day travelers can revel in a taste of wilderness adventure that is perfectly blended with our warm, attentive hospitality that is delivered by our QCL team. Sharing a passion for delivering your first class fishing trip in a remote paradise. Each member of our team brings a piece of your QCL Experience to life.

The QCL Experience, a simple way to describe that distinctive feeling you get when you think about your first class fishing trip; the recognizable sense of home upon your return. It is our passion to ensure each of our guests leave having experienced memories that you want to share for a lifetime.


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March 13, 2024 Tayler Fuerst0

Our Back of House team has prepared another QCL Signatures Series dish for you to prepare at home! Whether you are enjoying with guests or family, this Chili Crab will enhance any dinner.

Materials

  • Dungeness Crab, broken down | 4
  • Shallots | 3
  • Ginger | 3-ince piece
  • Red Chilis | 3
  • Ketchup | 30ml
  • Shrimp Paste | 5ml
  • Cooking Oil | 30ml
  • Chicken Stock | 360ml
  • Rice Wine Vinegar | 30ml
  • Sweet Chili Sauce | 120g
  • Green Onion, chopped | 1
  • Butter | 50g
  • Soy Sauce | 30ml
  • Palm Sugar | 30ml

Method

  1. In a food processor, add shallots, ginger, red chillies, garlic, ketchup, and shrimp paste. Pulse until it combined, forming a paste.
  2. Heat oil in a wok over medium heat, add the chilli paste and cook for five minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add the crab pieces into the wok and stir until they are fully coated. Allow the crab to absorb the flavours and colouring until it begins to turn red/orange in colour.
  4. Add the tomato puree, chicken stock, rice wine vinegar, sweet chilli sauce, soy sauce and palm sugar, then stir until combined. The crab should be fully orange by now. Place a lid on top, allowing the mixture to simmer for 15 minutes.
  5. Remove the crab legs and head, plating on a shallow dish.
  6. Add butter and green onion to the sauce and stir to combine.
  7. Pour the sauce on top of the plated crab, garnishing with cilantro.
  8. Serve and enjoy!

Don’t worry if you’ve moved through your supply of QCL caught fish already, our Taste of B-Sea program runs year round. The finest quality fish and shellfish, these products are Ocean Wise and come from some of the most sustainable fisheries in the world using the most eco-friendly fishing methods.

To learn more and to place your order, contact us | 1-800-688-8959


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September 6, 2023 Tayler Fuerst2

“And when we hear the call of the geese in the harbour, we know that it’s time to wrap it up for another season…”  That time has come!  We sent off our final group of guests yesterday, followed by a large portion of our crew.  Wow!  Is it ever a different place when they’re not here!

Our 33rd season at QCL was pretty epic.  We were able to welcome back quite a number of guests who’ve missed us over the past 4 years, as well as many newcomers who wanted to know what this place was all about. Our core group of QCL guests, whom we’re very fortunate to see almost every summer, were thrilled with many of the tweaks, both large and small, that we implemented this year.

Certainly, our new Coho Class of boats had to be a highlight for many, combining great functionality and performance with lots of comforts and convenience – for both guided and self-guided anglers.  New menu features and hospitality treats balanced out the program when our guests returned to the lodge at the end of the day.

Conversations among the guide team this past week were consistently positive about the fishing.  Huge volumes of feeding Chinook and Coho were present through the first half of the summer, and as the number of migratory salmon increased, the Tyee Bell was ringing more frequently every trip.  In short, it was busy on the boats!  Bottom fishing for halibut, lingcod and rockfish always balances out the fishing experience and provides a tasty variety of filets to enjoy at home.

But we have to say, at the end of every trip, and at the end of every season, what our guests always go out of their way to speak with us about, is essentially the QCL Experience.  That’s the very special combination of this amazing place and what people are able to do here, fully enveloped in the enthusiasm of our wonderful staff and the hospitality that they provide. That’s what puts a smile on everyone’s face up here.  We’re very thankful for the efforts of each of our team members and the continued support of our awesome guests.

We can’t wait to get back up here again next season and see you all again!

 


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August 26, 2023 Bre Guolo0

With the sun gleaming over Naden Harbour, guests and guides start the day keen on finding Chinook and Coho salmon. With these northwest winds, the fish and bait have been pushed into Cape Naden and the Mazarredo Islands – Where most of our fleet has been tacking hard on each tide putting guests into action. Guides have been running hearing and anchovy to entice the fish in to their gear.

Today for Boat 99, the sun was shining and though the wind had died down the swells were strong; forcing us to start our morning at the top of Cape Naden. with the flooding tide we had no issues running a cut plug on one side and a whole herring on the other, 23-39 ft on the rigger and 8 pulls on the back rod.

10 minutes into our first tack at Naden our deep rod goes off!  My guest Tyson jumped up and ran to the rod not knowing what to expect! 25 minutes later we landed a beautiful Chinook salmon, tapped out to 42 pounds! Tyson made the decision to release this Tyee. Thanks for letting this big one go!

It was a team effort –  From pulling gear to holding the net. Guests Lyndon and David, also onboard, played a large role in successfully getting this fish to the boat. This is how memories are made!

Tight lines and don’t forget to keep your tip up,

Guide, Karly Skakun

 


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August 20, 2023 Tayler Fuerst0

My best luck so far, these past couple of trips, has been at Cape Naden fishing quite shallow. My most consistent action with Chinook salmon has come from running a cut-plug herring at 19 feet, tight in the pocket, during and soon after high tide. Otherwise,  fishing deep offshore near the Little Peanut and the Pinnacles at about 150 feet on the downrigger, with KingKandys and whole herring, has been producing. Coho are in similar areas, to that of where Chinooks are being caught, just up a little higher.

Over the last few days the offshore program has seen an increase in productivity, with many boats heading that way!

We have some wind in the forecast this trip, so dress for the weather and bring extra layers to keep on hand. Additionally, we will be experiencing some strong tides so keep your eyes out for debris in the water!

Guide, Eric Roundhill


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August 10, 2023 Tayler Fuerst0

It’s a foggy morning in Naden Harbour. New guests have been anxiously waiting for the fog to clear, while old guests are reluctantly waiting to return to the busy world from their time in paradise. Finally, the fog lifts and the helicopters fly in one by one. The dock becomes a busy and excited place as guides greet their new guests and one by one, the boats all leave the dock for an afternoon of fishing.

I’ve got four guests who are keen on salmon fishing. After checking the tides and weather forecast, I decide to take them to my favourite salmon fishing point, Cape Naden, which is often productive on the ebb which coincides with this afternoon’s tide.

Cape Naden looks picturesque today – The tide is high, the whole kelp bed is visible and the current is ebbing as the water curls around the rocks heading west. The water is clear of debris and only a few boats are fishing the point. As we roll in and drop lines we see a boat or two catching fish every pass. As the afternoon goes on we catch a small Chinook, however we have yet to catch any fish worth keeping. Our patience is being tested as we make another inside pass that yields no results.

This time, we go a little further past the last eastern rock on the cape and as we make our turn, boom, the outside rod with and anchovy starts bouncing. My guest immediately spring into action popping the rod out of the holder and off the downrigger clip. It’s a nice Chinook that starts running and so the rest of us begin clearing rods. First comes the back rod which is taken out of the water and stowed up front. Next, I reposition the boat so that the Chinook is off to the side. Then, I go to clear the other downrigger rod, I pull it out of the rod holder, pop it off the release clip and begin to reel. All of a sudden I feel a grab! I set the hook and hand it over to my guest – We’re doubled up! Although this first fish was a nice Chinook, the second one is clearly bigger and starts peeling line in the opposite direction of the first fish. After a couple minutes of chaos we successfully netted a 21 pounder. The second fish was still way off in the distance making wake at the surface and peeling line. The mood was tense as this second fish dragged us offshore. After circling the fish and tiring it out we finally coaxed it into the net. It was a 37lbs Chinook! Celebrations are in order and it’s time to cap a successful first day of the trip at the Bell Ringer. We follow many other excited guests back to the Lodge where we tell stories of our day, take pictures of our catch and enjoy some “Fishmaster Ceasar’s”.

Guide, Gerritt Dunstee